Old Savannah Trolley Tour & Juliette Low’s House

Tuesday, March 25, 2014 (cont.)

We’d been told that the Old Town Trolley Tour was the best and most popular of the Savannah trolley tours to get an overview of the city, although there are many others, as well as walking tours, ghost tours, etc.

Because we had advance purchased tickets, we were able to park free for four hours. It was a large lot on the site of an old train depot flanked by warehouses.

Tam went and bought house tour tickets, determining the stops where we would be getting off. It was already noon when we arrived, and the trolleys were on a rotating schedule, so we were scheduled for the tour that left at 1:05. We got a guide which listed all the stops and what places of interest were at each one. There would be a main attraction, with other places of interest clustered around it, shown on a map, which was color coded for each stop.

The tour was narrated and I took pictures as best I could as the trolley rolled along – I had mixed success! I figured that being on the right side next to the window, I’d get good pictures, but it turned out that most of interesting things to photograph were on the left side! Dale was on the left side and snapping pictures every few seconds, it seemed! ??????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????

The Thunderbird Inn, a hotel with a funny sign: "At the intersection of 'Yes, ma'am' and 'Dude'."
The Thunderbird Inn, a hotel with a funny sign: “At the intersection of ‘Yes, ma’am’ and ‘Dude’.”
City Market near Ellis Square
City Market near Ellis Square

The first place we got off was Juliette Gordon Low’s house. Juliette Gordon Low was the founder of the Girl Scouts. We took the house tour, narrated by a docent who told us Juliette Low’s life story as we moved from room to room. She was known by her family as “Daisy” and used this nickname throughout her life.

????????????????????The patio and gardens behind the house was quite pretty. A troop of Girl Scout troop who had visited the house at the same time were taking group pictures.

Sculptures in patio behind Juliette Low's house: Cast bronze emperor cranes, in memory of Page Wilder Anderson (first US Girl Guide leader)
Sculptures in patio behind Juliette Low’s house: Cast bronze emperor cranes, in memory of Page Wilder Anderson (first US Girl Guide leader)
patio behind Juliette Low's house
patio behind Juliette Low’s house

???????????????????? ????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????The house is quite impressive from the outside – large by today’s standards, although Daisy Gordon’s family was considered “middle class” (upper middle class, for sure)! She was athletic and talented in the arts.

his antique doll house was on display in the gift shop (I'm sure it wasn't for sale) at Juliette Low's house.
his antique doll house was on display in the gift shop (I’m sure it wasn’t for sale) at Juliette Low’s house.

The man she married, William Low, was from a very wealthy English family and they moved to England after their marriage. I’m not sure if class had anything to do with it, but her marriage was unhappy. Her husband died in 1905 when the couple was separated. She spent a period of depression, feeling her life was without meaning, until she met Sir Robert Baden Powell, founder of the Boy Scouts in 1911. In 1912, she gathered 18 teenage girls to form the first troop of American Girl Guides. Her niece was one of the members of this first troop. The next year the name was changed to Girl Scouts.

Juliette Gordon Low died in 1927 of breast cancer.

(Some information that I had forgotten was retrieved by visiting the web site https://www.girlscouts.org/who_we_are/history/low_biography/.)

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s