Curitiba’s Jardim Botânico and Rua das Flores

November 14, 2016

It seemed sunny and relatively warm when we got out of the car at the Jardim Botânico (Botanic Garden). 

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On Eliane’s advice, though, I kept my windbreaker with me, tying it around my waist and sure enough, dark clouds soon hung ominously overhead.

We took the path toward the main structure, a 3-dome glass greenhouse.  Along the path were various colors of petunias, nothing spectacular.  Landscaped hedges formed concentric triangles on either side of the path.  It was more crowded than I expected, but the weather was decent and it was the day before a national holiday.

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Pansies at Jardim Botanico

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We entered the greenhouse and climbed the stairs to the upper level.  It was OK, but not very impressive really.  Eliane told me she’d never been here before, and she seemed to have the same opinion as I did about the place.

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This sculpture is of Erbo Stenzel (1911-1980), a native of Parana, who achieved fame as a sculptor and engraver. He also was a chess champion, winning many prizes and recognition in the game.*

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KODAK Digital Still Camera

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The tallest tree is outgrowing the greenhouse!

Off to one side was a sort of pretty alcove with bright colored flowers so we headed there.

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Even though it had started raining lightly, no one ran for shelter nor stopped their activities.  On the sloped lawns, kids were running around and teenagers played ball.

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We walked back toward the car and passed a group of young guys throwing and running with an American football!  I expressed surprise at this, but Carlos said American football was developing a fan base here.  Some people watched the games on satellite TV and now Curitiba has two football teams of its own! American teams are invited to come to play a game with these teams and help them improve their technique.

*Source information

It seemed to be clearing up some, so we headed to the Rua das Flores (Flowers Street), a pedestrian street closed to traffic in the center of town. I was happy about this, because it had been one of my favorite places to walk when I last stayed in Curitiba, in 1979.  Since Dale and I sometimes noticed different things, I’ve included some of his pictures as well as mine. Most of the photos speak for themselves.  If you visit Curitiba, I strongly recommend taking a stroll down Rua das Flores as part of your itinerary.

Palacio Avenida
This huge building is called “Palacio Avenida”, probably originally a hotel. Now it houses the offices of the bank Bradesco.
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This tram car used to be a sort of day care center, where parents who were shopping or had errands to do could drop their children for an hour or two and pick them up afterward. It is no longer in use, but it’s still there on Rua das Flores!

Flower vendor

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Beautiful old building

McDonald's in this colonial style building!

Rua das Flores, pedestrian street in downtown Curitiba

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This strip with raised areas down the middle of the street is for blind people to be able to find their way using a cane. We saw these in several places we visited in Brazil.

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~~~~~Another mall~~~~~

Since there was still a bit of rain, we went to another mall – a smaller one, less fancy than Patio Batel.  Although Dale and I both initially refused, we were easily persuaded to order sparkling wine, which they call espumante.  I tried to get online, but all the nearby WiFis were locked!  Carlos said it was maybe a new policy because the mall had just changed ownership and was now owned by an American company.

 

 

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