SYW: On Broken Hearts, Cellphones, Typing Books, Snakes and Virtual Choirs

It’s Monday! Time for Melanie’s Share Your World!

QUESTIONS:
What can you break even if you don’t touch it? (yes there is a real answer to this. I’ll reveal it in the next week sometime. Still, answer how you would like – no right or wrong answer)
A heart. All it takes is a “Dear John” letter! Or nowadays, just a text saying it’s over. 

What’s the most useful thing you own?

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My husband, Dale, is very useful.

The first thing that comes into my head is “my husband.” He’s very useful and I don’t know what I would do without him. But I don’t “own” him.

So I guess I will say my cellphone. Cellphones have become indispensable, because they do so many things that we’ve come to depend on. If something happens to me, I can call someone for help. If I remember something I wanted to tell someone, I can just send them a text, so that they can read the message and answer at their leisure. That way I don’t have to write myself a note to remind me of what I need to tell them. If I want to listen to music, I can go onto YouTube on my phone. When I exercise in the fitness center, I have a dance workout playlist on my phone to keep me going. When I am out for a walk, and I see something photograph-worthy, I can use the camera in my phone – not necessarily the best photo, but I can at least have a photo of that thing.  And sometimes the photos are high quality! If it’s a flower or plant I want to identify, I just go on my Plant Snap app on my phone. I also can go on Facebook to find out what people are talking about. There are a lot of legitimate criticisms of Facebook, but personally, I love it! It really helps me stay connected to people, especially now.

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I’ve never felt the need to update my Samsung Galaxy S7.

When I ask Dale something like, “What’s the weather supposed to be tomorrow?” he answers, “Wouldn’t it be nice if we had a little device we can use to find things out?” He’s telling me, in other words, look it up on your phone!  Sometimes I have a burning desire to find out something, such as how many coronavirus cases there are in Brazil, whether all swan eggs hatch on the same day, or who were the pharaohs in ancient Egypt’s 18th dynasty. You know, important stuff like that even if totally irrelevant to what is happening at the moment! If I’m bored, I have my cellphone I can play games on. I like word games like Wordscapes, Word Stacks, and Words with Friends. I also have jigsaw puzzles, Spider Solitaire and Sudoko. (I could even read my Kindle books on my phone if I wanted to, but I prefer reading on my tablet.) So there’s plenty to keep me occupied – IF my cellphone has enough charge and I can access a charger if necessary!

Finally, my phone has become extra important in this pandemic era. I can attend book groups at the library, church services and coffee hour afterwards, celebrate family members’ birthdays and other get togethers by using Zoom! I don’t feel so isolated when I can at least “see” my family and friends in a long-distance meeting.

(Even so, if all else fails, I always carry a couple of pens and a small pad of paper, just in case I forgot my cellphone or it needs charging. That way I can at least doodle or draw something I see nearby.)

Come to think of it, WHERE did I leave my phone? It probably needs a charge…

What’s The Silliest Reason You’ve Ever Gotten Into A Fight With Someone Over?
I borrowed a typing book (yes, this was in the time when we used typewriters!) from a co-worker. I noticed a lot of scribbling in it, but I thought, who cares. So when I wanted to give the book back, she wasn’t at work, so I left it on her desk. The next time I saw her was in the elevator. She seemed really crabby. I said, “Did you get the typing book back?”
She answered very angrily, “It’s written in.” Written in? Is she talking about the scribbles that were already there?  I said, “That scribbling was already in there.” She said nothing, so I tried to make a joke. “Maybe your little sister or brother got hold of it and scribbled in it.”  She wasn’t amused, but said, “I don’t have a little sister or brother.” Then she exited the elevator very abruptly and walked quickly back to her cubicle. She never talked to me again. Fortunately, she wasn’t more than a friendly acquaintance in the first place, so no loss! Still, it irked me for a long time that she accused me of scribbling in her typing book, when she must have known it was there already.

I’m sure I could come up with a better story than this if I didn’t have such a bad memory. The strange thing is that I even remember this particular incident. It was so unimportant, but somehow it got stamped in my memory!

If You Were A Snake, How Long Would You Want To Be? No, size does not matter.
I’ve always wanted to know what it would be like to slither. So I’d like to be long enough to really experience slithering…through grass, across sand, maybe even in water, or onto a big rock to sun myself.snake
By the way, I would be a harmless grass snake, like the one pictured here. I would want people to like me!

Gratitude and/or uplifting? Please share. We can all use some of those.

The other day, I wrote a post for Fandango’s Who Won the Week challenge about virtual choirs and how I find them uplifting. Their singing makes me grateful for the basic goodness of people.

 

Note: Photos of Samsung Galaxy S7 and snake are courtesy of Google Images.

SYW: On Parental Discipline, Time Wasting, Braces, Pizza Boxes, and the Coronavirus Pandemic

It’s time for a new set of questions from Melanie’s Share Your World.
Questions:
On A Scale Of 1-10, How Strict Were Your Parents?
This is relative. My parents were not strict in the sense that they never used corporal punishment (except one of the few times that my dad got angry, he chased me with a hairbrush! But he never used it). They ruled by consistent expectations. There were certain things we were obliged to do – not just chores, but for example, we all had to take seven years of piano lessons. We were obliged to call other adults that were not relatives by their title and last name (e.g. Mrs. Smith), especially friends of my parents. Still, being the youngest of five, I was spoiled and so was my brother, who was the only boy.

Their expectations were that we should live up to their values of respect, courtesy, civility, speaking clearly and correctly, getting an education, etc.. Just a scolding was often enough to stop an inappropriate behavior, but if the behavior was more serious, and many times when my brother and I got into fights, my mother would lock us in our rooms. There was a little metal hole attached to the doorframe and a hook attached to the door. Sometimes they would just tell us to go to our rooms.

What Wastes The Most Time In Your Day To Day Life?
Playing games on my phone, especially Words With Friends.

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Do They Bury People With Their Braces* On? (* “braces” in this scenario are those metal bits they put on people to straighten their teeth. I realize “braces” are also some item of clothing that I believe men wear to keep their socks up or something. I’m talking about the teeth option).
I really don’t know. I’ve never seen it, but then I try to avoid looking at a corpse in a coffin. The only young person I know who died around the time he might have had braces (age 12) was my nephew, and he didn’t have them. That was either because his teeth were straight or because he’d been battling brain cancer for two years and braces were the last thing on his parents’ minds.

Why Does A Round Pizza Come In A Square Box?

Have you ever seen a round box? OK, hat boxes used to be common, but now it’s very rare to see a round box, especially one as wide and flat as a pizza. I imagine round boxes are more difficult to make as well as to dispose of. A rectangular box can be broken down and flattened, making it easier to store as well as to recycle.

Gratitude: Share something you are grateful for right now. I know that’s a tough question. It helps to share those bright bits with folks though, because many of us are seeing through an increasingly dark glass.
I am grateful for all the people who help in any way to alleviate or combat the coronavirus pandemic. That includes those on the front lines – doctors and nurses – as well as people who can sew making masks. I’m grateful for anyone with the ingenuity and courage to do what they can to make others’ life easier. I’m grateful for people like my husband who always have an encouraging remark for everyone they encounter during this crisis and who remember to call family and friends just to check in.

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