RDP: Dancing, Yeah!

Ragtag Daily Prompt today is Dance.

A Sunday afternoon on Avenida Paulista, São Paulo, Brazil: Ballet and…

…political protest batucada: “Fora Temer” – a protest against the vice president (Temer) who took over for Pres. Dilma Roussef after her arrest.

Panama Canal Cruise – in Mexican town of Tuxtla Chico, Chiapas
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Panama Canal Cruise on board m/s Veendam: Mexican dancers
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Verde Valley School 70th anniversary: Saturday night dance

Lens-Artists #72 – Waiting

People wait.

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Waiting in line to get into the Louvre, Paris

 

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Waiting to enter Sacre Coeur Church, Montmartre, Paris

 

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Waiting to see the Mona Lisa up close, Louvre, Paris
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Marching band waiting their turn at a marching band competition, Vienna
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Waiting for the bride & groom to emerge from the church, Poulsbo, WA

Transportation vehicles wait.

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Parked bicycles wait for their owners to return, Amsterdam
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Cruise ship waits to board passengers to begin an ocean cruise, Amsterdam
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Bicycles wait up above, and boats wait down below – the frowning face means boats must stop and wait their turn to go under the bridge, Amsterdam
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Parked cars wait for their owners to drive them, Amsterdam

Animals and plants wait.

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Waiting to be planted in a garden, Des Plaines, IL
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Cat watches and waits for a moth on the screen, Des Plaines

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #72, 11/16/19: Waiting

 

 

Journey to Egypt, Part 14: Cruise to Edfu

December 29, 2018

Last night, our first night on our Nile cruise, I slept better than I have since the beginning of the trip! I loved my bed in our stateroom and the temperature was not too hot nor too cold (although the people in the staterooms across from ours did complain that their rooms were too cold), and it’s not stuffy like hotel room air. The pillows are perfect.

There were two choices for breakfast: the buffet in the dining area, or an omelet made to order out on the deck (of course, we could combine the two).

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Omelet station on deck of the Aida

We spent the first half of the day cruising the Nile on our way upriver to Edfu. It was a relaxing morning.

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Fisherman off el Hegz Island, where we had moored for the night.

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Besides fishermen, we saw large cruise ships…

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Three types of Nile River boats: a dahebeya, a fishing boat and a cruise ship

…and a heron on an island of flotsam.

Most of the time, the sails of the Aida were not unfurled; a dahabeya does not have a motor, and using only the power of wind would require the helmsman to tack, zigzagging across the river, which would cause delays to our itinerary. However, they agreed to put the sails up and we got into the tug boat so we could see the Aida with its sails raised. We were able to take photos from all angles.

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This photo shows another dahabeya going upriver with a tugboat in front, and hauling a small fishing boat behind.
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After we were back on the Aida, the helmsman gave us a photo opp by having us pretend to be controlling the sails!
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The upper deck of the Aida

More cruise ships and freighters:
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When we returned to our stateroom before lunch, the steward had created towel art in the form of a lotus flower.
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Lunch was a colorful buffet.
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The scenery along the shore became more urban as we approached the city of Edfu.

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This was a mausoleum on a hill, built for some rich man.

Finally the Aida approached the dock at Edfu where we would disembark to visit the Temple of Horus.
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When we got off the Aida, we walked along this fence to where our rides to the temple were waiting.

Music All Over the World

Nancy Merrill’s A Photo A Week Challenge this week is to show “live music.” Music is a very important part of my life. I love all types of music and am especially fascinated by “world” music – music from different countries and cultures.

Our favorite orchestra in the Chicago area is Chicago Sinfonietta. Every concert they play is unique and inclusive. They specialize in diversity, in honor of the founder of the orchestra, Paul Freedman, an African-American conductor and classical musician. They focus on a theme for each concert which includes performers from different genres and cultural groups. In this photo of their May 2018 concert, they invited a well-known professional gospel choir to perform with them.20180512_195835
Last November, they had a Day of the Dead themed concert, which included such works as Mozart’s Requiem, including a choir from Roosevelt University that wore skeleton costumes and masks during the performance. During the intermission, there were cultural dances and music from Mexico.
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Music evokes such emotion and nostalgia in me. When we took a cruise to the Panama Canal in March-April 2017, we stopped at a small port in Chiapas, Mexico, where some of us took an excursion to Tuxtla Chico (I have blogged about this), a charming small town where music and dances were performed for us. Within a short time, I didn’t want to leave – all my emotions associated with past trips to Mexico were brought to the surface by the cultural atmosphere and the typical music. Here some women dressed in beautiful flowered dresses danced to music played by a marimba band.
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Back on the cruise ship, some Mexican performers came aboard for a couple of days and performed for us by the Lido pool. This included a male singer and a couple of dancers, who performed dances from different regions of Mexico.

 

Steel pan music was also a feature of that cruise when we passed through the Caribbean, and Chicago Sinfonietta later that year featured steel pan music in one of their concerts. Here my husband Dale samples playing a steel pan, supervised by a professional steel pan player, leader of a steel pan band from Northern Illinois University, before the concert. NIU is possibly the only university in the country where music majors can specialize in steel pan music.20170916_185949.jpgI could continue with more examples of the music in my life, but this would become a very long post! So I’ll end with some “batucada” (percussion) from Flamengo Beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (recorded in November 2016).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday Photo Challenge: Winding & Windy

Frank Jansen at Dutch Goes the Photo has a Tuesday Photo Challenge. This week the topic is wind. Depending on how it’s pronounced it’s either a noun or a verb. Here are a few of each.

Glacier winding down a mountain at Glacier Bay National Park, AlaskaKODAK Digital Still CameraAt Glacier Bay National Park, a steward came around with split pea soup on a tray and handed it out to grateful passengers. It was so windy on the deck that the steward’s tray almost got blown away and he had to hold it with two hands!The steward holds on tight to the tray of soup.Here you can see that it’s windy by my blowing hair.
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Fast forward to this year:  On our recent road trip, we went to Rocky Mountain National Park near Denver, Colorado. We went up a very winding road, with a lot of switchbacks.
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Note the road sign on the far left.
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We saw winding mountain streams…
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…and a rushing waterfall that winds its way through descending cliffs.

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Adams Falls, Rocky Mountain National Park

At Hotel Donaldson in Fargo, North Dakota, they provide free wine and appetizers every evening in the lobby. We stayed two nights there last year, so you could say we were wined and dined at the hotel, to use a homophone! 🙂
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CFFC: Working Hard or Hardly Working?

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge this week is “Busy or People Working.”

Every year, the last weekend in April (this weekend!), our church has a huge rummage sale, our biggest fundraiser of the year. We always need a lot of volunteers.
STAS13-IMAG0363.jpgThe sale takes over nearly every room in the church. We have a clothing room (above), housewares (below – the biggest department), Housewares, always a busy, popular department.holiday, antiques, jewelry, toys, baked goods, books/CDs/DVDs, and outside there is a furniture tent and hot food (hamburgers, hot dogs, etc.).20160421_111420Our church also does mission work. One of our missions is feeding the poor and sheltering the homeless. Des Plaines has a local PADS shelter on Fridays at a nearby church, where homeless adults get a hot meal for dinner, breakfast, sack lunches, and a place to sleep for the night. Different churches sign up for the Fridays they prefer and get volunteers from their church to work the shifts and make or bring food.  Some people work in the kitchen, preparing for dinner…20150227_190349
and then serve the food to the guests.
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In the summer, we have at least one church service outside, with special invited musicians and ice cream afterward! This is the Chicago Metropolitan Jazz Ensemble.20150705_095043.jpgEmergency workers are important in any community.  The American Red Cross collects supplies for people in disaster areas.IMAG0367-RedCrosshelpTeaching is a lot of work, even during special events when we look like we’re having fun (and sometimes we are)! Here’s a teacher holding up the flag of her alma mater during an annual College Day rally.
Sandy Rywelski holds up WIU flag next to her class.
The music teacher works hard – and so do the kids – with the different age groups to put on an annual show for the different grade levels. Here is the 1st-2nd grade music show.
20150415_134623.jpgA student helps out on the last day of school by cleaning the chalkboards.269
For children, school is their workplace and for very young children, play is their work; it’s how they learn. These kindergartners love building things with blocks.
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And in December, everyone works hard on holiday projects. Here, a teacher’s assistant helps kindergartners make gingerbread houses.
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Sometimes, people work to provide entertainment for others, either as volunteers or for tips, such as at a summer concert in the park.
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While kids are getting their balloons, the band plays.
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People with special talents perform for tourists for tips, such as this young man in Tallinn, Estonia.
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Waiters in Japanese restaurants “perform” for diners, cooking their food right in front of them.
IMAG1924.jpgSome of the hardest working people work on cruise ships, in kitchens…20170324_103302or as stewards, such as this one trying to hold a tray of hot soup steady for the tourists on the windy deck of a ship in Glacier Bay National Park in Alaska.The steward holds on tight to the tray of soup.
Some athletes and actors make millions entertaining the public. They might even get a trophy, such as when the Chicago Cubs won the World Series in 2016!20161103_001137.jpg
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Go Cubs Go! video

 

 

 

 

APAW: “A Crowd of People Stood and Stared”*

Nancy Merrill’s “A Photo a Week” (APAW) topic for this week is Crowd.

 

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A crowd of people on board m/s Veendam watch the gates of a lock open at the Panama Canal.

 

 

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A crowd of people in the ballroom at Chicago’s Symphony Center watch Mexican dancers during the intermission of Chicago Sinfonietta’s Day of the Dead concert.

 

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Chicago Sinfonietta concert intermission activity: make marigolds out of tissue paper for a Mexican-style Day of the Dead altar. My friend Marcia (far left blonde hair) shows a crowd of people how to do this.

 

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A crowd of family members at a post-Thanksgiving gathering in Madison, WI at a cousin’s house. (A bit of a cheat here: My brother-in-law took the picture using my cellphone camera!)

 

 

 

*From A Day In the Life by the Beatles

A Photo a Week Challenge: Jewel Colors

Nancy Merrill has a Photo a Week Challenge with a theme this week of jewel colors.

Sea and sky – sapphire, pearl/mother of pearl, lapis lazuli20170324_163804.jpg

Décor on a cruise ship – Sapphire, amethyst, ruby, beryl, gypsum, peridot20170403_205604 (2)

Chicago at night – turquoise, sapphire, onyx20170920_191538.jpg

Chihuly detail – ruby, sapphire, amethyst, topaz, peridot, garnet, carnelian, moonstone20171110_101902 (2)

sunset at sea – topaz, onyx, agate, moonstone20171004_173346_001.jpg

my new Prius!! – opal, moonstone, sea pearl (that’s the name of its color)20171116_183525_001.jpg

Traversing the Panama Canal

March 27, 2017

Today we traversed the Panama Canal!  We entered the canal from the Caribbean side at about 6:00 a.m. A narrator came on board to broadcast what we were watching. When I woke up enough to go outside on our veranda, I took some pictures of the rising sun silhouetting some of the large equipment as we entered the canal.

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Dale (my husband) took this one – he got up earlier than I did!

Entering on the Caribbean side, ships enter a large bay next to which the city of Colón is situated; then they wait their turn to enter the channel into the Gatún Locks. The Veendam entered the narrower of the older locks. From the ship’s deck, I could see cars and trucks going across on an underpass – hard to believe there’s a road down there. Next to the Veendam was the Norwegian Pearl, a larger cruise ship that needs more width. The New Locks were built to accommodate even large cargo and cruise vessels. These were built a little distance away. We pulled up alongside the Norwegian Pearl and watched as it was raised, gradually revealing each of its lower decks. Passengers lined the decks of both ships.

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Railroad tracks on either side of the locks were used for locomotives tethered to the ships at various points. The Veendam employed about six of these locomotives, which did not actually pull the vessel. The ship operated on its own power but the locomotives with taut ropes attached to the ship kept the ship centered, even though it was nearly as wide as the channel. These motorized engines drove up and down the tracks on incline and decline ramps as we passed through each lock stage. The doors of each lock were almost completely submerged, but rose as the water emptied from one section of the locks to the next. We started out being raised at a series of three stages, each set of doors submerge as the water level filled to match the next stage.
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The canal is an amazing feat of engineering, especially since it was conceived and built a century ago against all odds. The locks technology, of course, was already well-known, there being a number of examples early in the 19th century. But originally the French engineer put in charge wanted to simply carve a passage straight through the isthmus, as had been his experience building the Suez Canal. However, the isthmus of Panama had mountains and its terrain covered with jungle. It rains – hard – half the year, making construction projects even more difficult. It was an American engineer, John Frank Stevens, who conceived of a series of locks through the mountains, ending in the largest manmade lake at that time, Gatún Lake, the result of damming the river. This dam was necessary in order to maintain the water level of the lake at 88.5 feet.

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Cargo ship owned by Japanese company NYK Line

 

For more on the history of the Panama Canal, the web site is: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panama_Canal

An excerpt from another web site explains how a ship goes through the canal:

To transit the Panama Canal, a ship entering from the Atlantic side at Colon would first navigate through roughly seven miles of dredged canal at sea level through marshy lowlands. At Gatun, the vessel would approach the enormous, sloping earthen dam that holds back the water in Gatun Lake. The vessel would then ascend a three-step lock and enter the man-made lake. From there, the next 32 miles of the journey to the Pacific Ocean would be upon the placid waters of Lake Gatun. After passing through the Culebra Cut, the lake would terminate at Pedro Miguel, where the ship would descend down a one-step lock into a small intermediary lake before descending the final two steps back to sea level at Miraflores. From there, the vessel would again navigate through another seven miles of dredged lowlands before entering the Pacific Ocean near Panama City.

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Although the Panamanian jungle was a challenge to the engineers of the canal, the high amount of rain ended up being an advantage: each vessel that passes through the canal uses 52,000,000 gallons of water per transit. An average of 25 ships pass through the canal daily. Multiply these two numbers and the importance of the rainy season becomes obvious – a lot of rain is required to replenish the amount of water displaced each day!
In 2016, construction on widening the locks to accommodate larger ships was completed.

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Gatún Lake is situated between the Gatún Locks on the Caribbean side and the Pedro Miguel and Miraflores Locks on the Pacific side. It snakes around in various directions  and has created many islands and peninsulas. The scenic views of this lake were quite pretty.
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In the lake, where we spent about two hours, I saw lots of cargo ships, mostly container ships, with some names I recognized – NYK, MSC – and some with names I was not familiar with. Large container ships have the capacity to carry up to about 14,000 20 ft. containers (or about 7,000 40 ft. containers).

At the far end of the lake, we passed under the Centennial Bridge, a fairly new construction.

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We then entered the Pedro Miguel and Miraflores Locks which lowered the level of the water and we could watch as water poured out into the next section.

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Our ship was released on the Pacific side at 4:00 p.m. before passing under an even larger bridge, the Bridge of the Americas, which cost $104 million to build. This bridge marked the end of the canal and the entrance to the Pacific Ocean.

Both of these bridges sustain a lot of traffic and are high enough for tall ships to pass under them.

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A colorful building on the Panama City side of the isthmus. I don’t know what it is, but my guess is it is an arts center or concert venue.

 

The most difficult part of observing all this was the oppressive heat. I minimized my exposure to the direct sun by staying in the shade as much as possible.  Even though the water was warm, it was refreshing to take a dip in the swimming pool once we were through the canal!

 

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Dale and yours truly on deck

 

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The pool was a refreshing reprieve from the heat!