L-APC #146: The Beauty Is In the Details

I think I am late for this one, but I’m participating anyway! Lens-Artists’ Photo Challenge #146 is to focus on the details.

In 2019, we took a Viking river cruise, which started in Amsterdam and took us down part of the Rhine River. Our first stop in Germany was in Cologne, with its fabulous cathedral. Its imposing towers can be seen rising above the rest of Cologne’s buildings, this photo taken from our cruise ship as we arrived in the morning.

Officially named the Cathedral Church of St. Peter, this Gothic architectural wonder took centuries to build. Construction began in 1268 but was halted around the middle of the 16th century. It was finally finished in 1880, remaining true to its medieval plan, and at 157 meters (515 ft) it is the third tallest church in the world. It was named a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1996.

Its façade contains a dizzying number of carved details, none of which are the same. (And these are all on its exterior!)

I was surprised to see these dark stripes up close.
I was amazed to see the ladder going up this spire! I can’t imagine someone actually climbing up it!
There is a sheep in the middle of this flower-like design – I have never noticed it before!
With so many intricate details, it’s no wonder that it took many centuries to build!
I zeroed in on this skull, somewhere on the panel above.
A stained glass window, viewed from the outside.
Above each archway is something different.
Similar to one of the flower-like patterns above, but with no sheep in the center!

Historical details from Cologne Cathedral – Wikipedia.

Bright Stained Glass of a Charleston Church

I was looking through my 2014 photos of Savannah and Charleston for another post, and came across this bright circle of stained glass from The Circular Congregational UCC Church in Charleston.

Ceiling stained glass

I also took this photo of other stained glass windows, the beauty in their simplicity, at the same church.

Stained glass windows
This view of the church’s sanctuary helps visualize the circular-ness of the interior.
Front facade of Circular Church

The church had a rather interesting graveyard in back, which we also explored, with some very old and historical graves.

Day 28 of Becky’s April Bright Squares photo challenge

Monday Window: Dohany St. Synagogue

The Dohany St. Synagogue, also known as the Great Synagogue, in Budapest, Hungary, is the largest synagogue in Europe and the 4th largest in the world. It can accommodate close to 3,000 worshippers.

The synagogue was built between 1854 and 1859 in the Moorish Revival style, incorporating decoration based on Islamic models from North Africa and la Alhambra in Granada, Spain. The Viennese architect reasoned that no distinctive Jewish style of architecture could be identified, so he used elements from the people most closely related to the Israelites, most particularly the Arabs.

These windows and those in the next photo depict scenes from the Old Testament.

The synagogue constituted the border of the Jewish Ghetto in Budapest during the Nazi occupation of Hungary, and the complex includes the Jewish Museum, Heroes’ Temple, the graveyard and Holocaust Memorial.

The Dohany St. Synagogue is the center of the Reform Jewish denomination in Budapest. From there, you can take a walking tour of the Jewish Quarter, an interesting historic area in the Pest part of the city.

Posted for Ludwig’s Monday Window photo challenge.

Information obtained from Wikipedia.

Castle Perspectives

A castle on a hill…sounds dreamy, doesn’t it? And to us modern tourists, seeing one castle after another on the Rhine River is a dream come true – we admire their beauty and their history. Castles were built not just as residences for royalty, but fortifications against invading enemies. Positioning them on hilltops above a river (which would have been the main form of transportation in medieval times) was meant to be imposing; they were symbols of power and strength; a hilltop position provided a view up and down the river, to spot adversaries from afar. (Although note that one of the castles in this gallery is actually right ON the river, not far above it.) Many castles were dark, damp places, fires burning for warmth in only a few rooms.

Thinking about these castles from that perspective takes some of the glamor away. Even so, they are worthy of admiration. One of them – Marksburg Castle (the white one with red trim – 2nd and 3rd photos) – we were able to tour, but I would have loved to explore some of the others. What is amazing is that these structures have been standing for centuries – they were built to last and of course many of them have undergone significant renovations.

Although Americans are amazed to see and visit these representations of centuries of European history (since we have nothing either as old or as symbolic of feudal society), I suppose people who are used to seeing them all the time don’t think about their history and probably take them for granted. Another perspective, I guess.

Posted for Becky’s July Square Perspectives photo challenge, day 24.

Perspectives of a Stairway

During the lockdown, we took a little jaunt out of metro Chicago and found ourselves in the town of Woodstock, IL. Woodstock is most famous for its historical square in the center of town, dominated by the imposing Woodstock Opera House. It is now used as a theatre and arts center. Here are 2 perspectives of a long stairway that stretches up one side of the building; in the one taken from the side across the street, you can see the two landings, where there are access doors on different floors.

Which photo do you think makes the stairway look longer and harder to climb? Which do you find more aesthetically interesting?

LAPC 99: The Old and the New

Amy of Lens-Artists invites us this week to show old and new with our photos and stories.

On our last trip to Brazil, we spent our first week staying with friends in the southern city of Curitiba, which has well over 1 million inhabitants. The city has grown a lot since I was last there in 1979! In this photo, the juxtaposition between old and new can be seen in the Centro Histórico (historical center), with Portuguese-style buildings from the 18th and 19th centuries dwarfed by modern skyscrapers.

We then spent about a week in São Paulo. Every Sunday, a major avenue, Avenida Paulista, is closed to motorized traffic; pedestrians and bicyclists have the street to themselves on that day. Being a major street, Avenida Paulista is lined with ultra modern architecture, but there are historical monuments there also, which visitors can explore. At the far end of this avenue is the Casa das Rosas, named for its rose gardens, a Victorian mansion that has become part of Brazil’s historic patrimony. Behind this partial view of the house, a glass blue skyscraper rises high.

In São Paulo’s downtown, old and new live side by side, above and below. These 19th century buildings, which can be admired for their colors nd wrought-iron balconies, now house modern stores on their lower levels.

Two years later, we were in Egypt, where we saw many monuments of its 3500 year old civilization. The Egyptians are both proud of their heritage and dependent economically on tourism. This modern apartment building is decorated with motifs of ancient Egypt.

While visiting the ancient pyramids in Giza, just outside the city of Cairo, we also took in a museum housing a restored ancient boat belonging to one of the first pharaohs. These boats were buried in pits next to the king’s tomb because the ancient Egyptians believed he would need his boat to travel to the afterworld. While the pyramids and the boat are ancient, the hexagonal Giza Solar Boat Museum which houses the ancient boat is quite modern looking on the outside, in contrast with the 3,500 year old pyramid behind it!

We visited the mortuary temple of Hatshepsut, a woman who ruled as pharaoh for nearly 20 years during Egypt’s 18th dynasty. I took this photo of my silly husband with his Nikon camera hanging down over his chest, posing with two Egyptian guards dressed in traditional garb in one of the temple’s sanctuaries.

Every one of the monuments was swarming with cellphone-toting tourists snapping photos.

South of Aswan is the city and monument of Abu Simbel, which is less touristy, because many people do not want to take the two-plus journey there to see the twin temples built by Ramses II. When the Aswan High Dam was built in the 1960s, it caused a lake to form south of the dam, which flooded previously inhabited areas. Because of its historical value, a huge effort was made, before the dam could be built, to remove the ancient monuments that would otherwise end up underwater. Ramses II’s temple and the smaller temple next to it he had built for his beloved wife Nefertari were divided painstakingly into sections and lifted 200 meters higher where a cliff had been carved out for its placement to look at much like the original location as possible. In the old position, Ramses II’s architects had cleverly created an inner chamber in which there were statues of the pharaoh and two gods, which received direct sunlight for 45 minutes on only two days of the year – his birthday and his coronation date – February 22 and October 22. One of the gods, Ptah, remained always in shadow, for he was the god of darkness. When the monuments were raised up to the higher cliff in the 1960s, the sun’s rays no longer illuminated the statues on those two dates, but close – they now shine upon the statues for fewer minutes on Feb. 21 and Oct. 21, only a day earlier.

Several of Egypt’s ancient monuments, including the temples at Abu Simbel, now have a special light show for tourists, which project colorful images onto the outer face of the monuments starting at twilight. As the images are shown, there is narration to accompany them in several languages that you listen to with an earbud attached to a small transmitter. New technology is juxtaposed with ancient buildings by using them as a “movie screen” for the images. During the projection of the images, it is difficult to make out the shapes and features of the statues behind them.

Beginning of the show, just after twilight
These projected images are from photos of actual Egyptian paintings, used to tell the history of this ancient civilization, as well as from photos telling the story of the project to move the monuments to their current location.

In Israel, where we traveled after our tour of Egypt, there are also many ancient places. Much of the original wall of Jerusalem and its gates still exists; millions of tourists and residents enter those gates on a daily basis. Here are some young Israelis dressed in their military uniforms about to enter this ancient gate.

In Gethsemane, there is a garden with ancient olive trees. One of them is exceptionally old – dating from the time of Jesus and is believed to possibly have been a young tree when he leaned against it to pray on the eve of his crucifixion. In order to protect it, a fence now surrounds it.

Finally, while on a boat tour of the canals and harbor of Amsterdam, I took this photo of Amsterdammers in a boat shaped like a Heineken barrel, about to pass under a medieval bridge.

April Squares 29: Iowa State Capitol

The Iowa state capitol in Des Moines is atop a hill and offers a panoramic view of the city’s downtown. The exterior is entirely of stone with elaborate columns, cornices and capitals.20180927_094019
Looking up inside toward the top of the dome
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Posted for Becky’s April Squares with the topic TOP.

The Iowa state capitol building is one of the prettiest I have seen, so I am including more photos highlighting the decorative tile floors and ceilings. The interior is constructed with several types of Iowan wood as well as 29 types of imported marble.
The House of Representatives, looking down:
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and above, elaborate decor.SONY DSC
Colorful designs mark the floors, stairways and ceilings.
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Mosaic murals
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Looking toward the center of the building, the rotunda below
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The library is a real gem!
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If you are ever in Des Moines, the state capitol is worth a visit – bring your camera!

Source:
Wikipedia: Iowa State Capitol

Thursday Doors: Woodstock

Thursday of last week  (is that all? It seems longer!), we were going stir crazy from being stuck at home, and decided to take a ride into the countryside. No harm if there’s no one around, right?

We were also looking for hand sanitizer and after going into three stores, we went to Walgreens. They are keeping hand sanitizer under the counter at the check-out, and rationing it so everyone has a chance to get some. They were just two small bottles, but I think they’ll be enough for now! And they have aloe!20200402_164833

In our quest for hand sanitizer, we ended up going straight up Hwy 14 (Northwest Hwy) and passed through a lot of little towns.

So we ended up, not in the country, but in Woodstock, Illinois! Woodstock is a historic town and was the site for filming of the movie Groundhog Day.  As we walked the streets of downtown Woodstock, we did see a few references to this claim to fame.

Almost all the stores were closed, of course, and we only saw a few other people pass by. One had a dog on a long leash and Dale stopped to pet it. But what I was really interested in was the Woodstock Opera House! An opera house is probably the last thing I would expect to see in Woodstock, so I was eager to have a look.DSC02830
The opera house is the largest building in Woodstock. Of course, I had to get a few close-ups of its doors!
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Side view of the building:
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In Groundhog Day, the building was featured as the Pennsylvanian Hotel. It was built in 1889, designed to be a multi-purpose facility and also housed some city administrative offices, police and fire departments.  It became McHenry County’s center for entertainment by traveling vaudeville, minstrel and drama companies.

There have been several renovations to the building. The interior has been fully modernized, including the technology used in modern entertainment shows, yet it retains its historic character.

The City of Woodstock owns the building but it is now used solely as a performance venue and is on the National Register of Historic Places.

Perpendicular to the opera house on the historic square in downtown Woodstock is the old County Courthouse and Jail.
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The old courthouse was built in 1857, to closely resemble the Cook Co. Courthouse, built four years earlier, but the Cook Co. Courthouse was eventually destroyed in the Great Chicago Fire of 1871. This building is also on the National Register of Historic Places and now houses various private businesses as well as a restaurant and art gallery.
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Next to the old courthouse is the old county jail, famous for holding labor leader Eugene Debs, who organized the Pullman strike, which was ruled illegal. He spent six months in the jail and he became good friends with the warden and his family. The old courthouse functioned as a courthouse until 1973.
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This structure was built in 1887 as the Sheriff’s House and Jail.
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We walked around the mostly deserted historic square, where I took these photos of doors and other sights.

A lot of doorways had signs on them saying the business was closed for quarantine.

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I think this used to be a door – from the markings on the bricks below, there might have been a stairway up to it at one time.

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Even the little library (left) had a sign that it was closed due to the quarantine!

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This tour of Woodstock was sponsored by Norm’s Thursday Doors.  Historical information on the opera house and the old courthouse was obtained from Wikipedia.

Friday Fun: In the Distance

Here are some 2019 travel photos for Aroused’s Friday Fun: Distance.

Caesarea & Jerusalem, Israel:

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The taller building farthest out in the distance is allegedly the site where the apostle Paul was imprisoned for two years.

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Sailboats in the distance, on the Mediterranean

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Looking down from Mt. Scopus, old and new Jerusalem spreads into the distance.

Rhine castles in Germany:
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Goats in the distance on a hill among ruined walls

I kept thinking of this song while doing this post. I think the lyrics are fitting for these days of fear and crisis.