CB&WPC: Long

Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge this week is things that are long.

Long necks
DSC02902 (2)

Long necks and long legs!SONY DSC
SONY DSC
Long stem (bell stand) and long trunk (palm tree)
SONY DSC
Man-made long-ness:
The Sphinx’s long front legs
20181224_124544 (2)
Long stairway
DSC02866 (2)
Tall minarets
20181225_133505d (2)
Long (and tall) bridge
20190621_104958 (2)
Tall obelisks (they were long before they were hoisted into position 😉 )
DSC_0132 (2)
20190613_113615 (2)
Long-necked tower
DSC00110 (2)
Very long building! (and this is only a partial view!)
DSC00217 (2)

 

Len-Artists: Reflections of…

Guest host Shower of Blessings has given us the theme for Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #87: Reflections.

My car is a source of several types of reflections:

Reflections of holiday lights on its hood
20191224_212233
Light from its headlights reflecting on snowfall
20200117_185246
An image in its driver’s side mirror (Rocky Mountain National Park)
20180531_162433
Bodies of water are also great sources for photographing reflections:

One of the ponds at our senior community – the reflection was clearer on the water side (left) than the ice side (right).20200108_155657
Hippo and its reflection (Serengeti National Park, Tanzania)
SONY DSC
Egrets on the edge of a lake (Tarangire National Park, Tanzania)
SONY DSC
In this close-up of two geese that are part of a sculpture, the reflection of the top of the sculpture, geese in flight, can be seen in the pond. (Chicago Botanic Gardens)
20190531_105958
Polished surfaces, such as glass and mirrors, are good places to look for reflections.

Glass pots on display at the Museum of Glass in Tacoma, Washington – the pattern at the bottom of the pot on the left is reflected on the platform.
20190915_123558
Glass bowl
20190915_124246
Glass sculpture on the roof of the museum after a rainfall – the birds are actually reflected in the puddle – it reminded me of the egrets in Tanzania!
20190915_135920
The polished floor in the courtyard of a mosque in Cairo, Egypt
20181224_191709
It took me awhile looking at this photo to realize it was actually a mirror image I was photographing, at a restaurant in Cairo. There was also a mirror at the far end, where the actual scene of our group having dinner was reflected, in the second photo.
20181224_195452
20181224_195502
Finally, semi-spherical mirrors were used to enhance flower exhibits at the annual orchid show (Chicago Botanic Gardens). This photo is a bit blurry but I liked the reflection – and you can see my camera in my hand at left!
DSC02784

And now, a theme-related video of a golden oldie from the 1960s!

 

Worship in the Middle East

Frank Jansen at Dutch Goes the Photo has selected worship as his photo challenge theme for Holy Week. I share the sadness of the world for the devastating fire at Notre-Dame de Paris. But there are many holy places around the world that inspire awe where people worship.
Below are photos of worship from Judaism, Islam, Christianity, and the ancient Egyptian religion.

20190113_103658
Prayer at the symbolic tomb of King David (not his real tomb) – Jerusalem, Israel

 

20190114_133752
The Western Wall (or the Wailing Wall) in Jerusalem is the only remaining vestige of the ancient temple of Jerusalem. Every day people come here to pray for loved ones, either those lost or those far away. It is customary to write the name of the person you are praying for on a scrap of paper and insert it into a crack in the wall. Every week these papers are collected by rabbis and kept in a sacred place – they are never thrown away. When a person is finished praying at the wall, they walk backwards, still facing the wall. Some maintain this all the way across the square; others after a short distance from the wall.
20181224_193010
A Muslim man praying in the “mihrab” at Al-Azhar Mosque – this niche in the wall of a mosque indicates the direction of Mecca. Muslims must face Mecca when they pray.
20181224_191634
Open courtyard at Al-Azhar Mosque in Cairo, Egypt, with two of its minarets rising up behind. Five times a day, verses from the Koran are broadcast from these minarets, calling Muslims to prayer. 
20181225_142904d.jpg
Altar at the Church of the Virgin Mary (or the “Hanging Church”), a Coptic Orthodox church in Cairo. Those of Orthodox faith do not have statues in their churches, which are considered idolatry. Instead they have icons, or images, of the Holy Family, disciples and saints.
20190114_163110
At the Garden Tomb site in Jerusalem (where it is believed that Jesus was buried), groups of Christian pilgrims gather for holy communion.  The “wine” (grape juice, actually) was served in tiny cups made of olive wood, which we were given to keep as a remembrance.

The ancient Egyptians had a pantheon of gods that they worshipped, and many of their temples contain images of pharaohs and others worshipping the gods.

20181229_150123
Altar and shrine in the sanctuary of the Temple of Horus in Edfu, Egypt. Horus was one of the most important gods for the Egyptians and is often depicted with the head of a falcon.

 

20181231_154050 (2)
A typical scene portraying a pharaoh making offerings to a god. The image on this pillar in Kom Ombo, Egypt shows the pharaoh (left) making an offering to Horus, the falcon god (right).
20181225_100617d
Akhenaten was considered the “heretic” king because he tried to introduce monotheism to the Egyptian religion. He banned the worship of many gods, claiming that Aten (the Sun, represented by a disk with rays flowing downward) was the one and only true god. In this relief at the Egyptian Antiquities Museum in Cairo, Akhenaten (in front) is shown worshipping Aten, along with his wife, Nefertiti, and two of their daughters, by offering up lotus flowers (the sacred flower of ancient Egypt) to the sun god. After Akhenaten’s death, the Egyptians reverted back to worshipping their many beloved gods.

One Word Sunday: Vertical

Debbie S. at Travel With Intent has a challenge called One Word Sunday. This week the word is vertical.

You know spring is coming when you see vertical shoots emerging from the ground in your garden! Des Plaines, Illinois, USA20190318_161813.jpg
Vertical columns at the ruins of Caesarea, Israel
DSC06930.JPG
Upright slab (stela) with vertical symbols at Temple of Horus, Edfu, Egypt
20181229_155445
Minaret and satellite tower, Edfu, Egypt
DSC_0294

CFFC: Shiny: Photographic Effects and Mistakes

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge theme this week is shiny.  Using photographic manipulation and mistakes added to the shiny-ness of some of these photos!

Icicles – I got the effect I was looking for in this shot, with the late afternoon sun shining behind the icicles to create a golden glow. (Taken from my living room window)
DSCN8329
The full moon rising in the darkness plus the bright holiday lights on people’s balconies brought out the contrast between dark and light. Using my cellphone camera made the moon look larger and shinier than it actually was. (Taken across the street from my church in Des Plaines)
20171203_181254.jpg
I cropped this shot to focus on the shiny golden table surface with the reflection of a shiny wine glass. (Restaurant in Cairo, Egypt)
20181224_195431 (2)
This photo needed no modification – the shiny white marble floor of this mosque reflected the architecture around it, creating an awe-inspiring effect. (Al-Azhar Mosque, Cairo, Egypt)
20181224_191709.jpg
The Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem, Israel is easy to spot with its shiny golden dome standing out against the shades of white of the old city. I enhanced the contrast to emphasize this magnificent building.
SONY DSC
This photo was an accident – I had my camera on the wrong setting so this photo of sailboats on the Mediterranean Sea (at Cesarea, Israel) was overexposed. But I liked the effect and the shiny surface of the Mediterranean casts a white glow on the scene. (I also discovered I needed to clean my lens!)
DSC06933.JPG
The day following this, we drove along the coast of the Dead Sea by motorcoach on our way to Masada. It was still relatively early, so the rising sun made a shiny reflection on the surface of the Dead Sea, our first view of it.  Once again, my cellphone’s sensitivity to bright light made the sun bigger and brighter than it was.
20190112_072340

CFFC: Patterns Around the World

For Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Patterns, I am going multicultural!

November 2018: At a Chicago Sinfonietta concert celebrating the Indian festival of Diwali,  during the intermission, audience members (especially children) made their own Diwali patterns using glue and glitter on preprinted patterns. Here are two of my favorites.
20181112_204627.jpg
December 2018: In Egypt, we visited Al-Azhar Mosque with beautiful Islamic patterns.
20181224_192935d.jpg
At a Christian church on Christmas Day, we visited a Coptic church known as the “Hanging Church” where there were many examples of Arabic influence in the décor inside the church.

January 2019: We visited the Church of all Nations in Jerusalem, Israel, next to the Garden of Gethsemane:
Floor tile patterns

Decorative gate in front of the church20190113_080512
In Old Jerusalem, we went to Temple Mount where the famous golden Dome of the Rock is located. The outside of this building is decorated with beautiful mosaic patterns in a style typical of Islamic art:
20190114_083031
January 26, 2019: Back home again, our daughter got married at an interesting, eclectic venue (normally used as a photography studio) in which there are several one-person bathrooms, each decorated differently. My favorite was the one decorated with a Frida Kahlo theme. Here are some of the colorful Mexican style tiles on the floor:
20190126_141139
I hope you have enjoyed these patterns from around the world!

For more about Al-Azhar Mosque in Cairo, Egypt, see Journey to Egypt: Part 4 – Visiting a Mosque and Celebrating Christmas in Cairo.

For more about the Hanging Church in Cairo, Egypt, see Journey to Egypt, Part 6: Coptic Churches & Ben Ezra Synagogue.

For Israel locations, I will be blogging about them soon!

Curitiba: Feira do Largo da Ordem

Curitiba, November 13, 2016

Another cool day.  Eliane drove us to the Feira do Largo da Ordem downtown – Carlos didn’t go with us because he hates crowds.

20161113_133115

And crowded it was! This feira is a crafts market which takes place every Sunday from 9 am to 2 pm, with well-made craft items, some beautiful, cute or clever.  It is located in the center of the Historic District next to the Presbyterian Church and Tiradentes Square. According to its web site, an average of 15,000 people visit the fair every  Sunday. Sometimes there are expositions of antique cars and the fair is very convenient to having lunch at one of the surrounding restaurants.  Besides craft items including hand made jewelry, paintings, items for the home and novelties, there are also antiques and old books and magazines for sale.  My husband and I both bought t-shirts, and I also bought a tote bag with an araucária (Paraná pine tree) imprinted on it.

20161113_122856

20161113_122904

20161113_122959

20161113_124043

20161113_124102
On the left, a doctor is giving a prostrate exam and on the right, a woman is having a gynecological exam. In the foreground is a miniature of a dentist’s office and patient.

Free samples of cube-shaped gummy candies were being offered at one booth – I liked them because they were soft but don’t stick to your teeth.  We sampled many different flavors but in the end I bought only two small packages of cachaça-flavored gummies, which will make unique souvenirs.  I also bought a small jar of mango-passion fruit jam, not too sweet.

dk-na-feira
I tried on a Harry Potter “sorting hat”!

Meanwhile, my husband Dale (who took most of these pictures) noticed the towers of a mosque behind the booths and went to investigate. He photographed the mosque which was just behind the fair – I don’t know why we hadn’t noticed it when we were in this same area the day before!

20161113_125023

The mosque, too, was crowded!

20161113_125019

20161113_125044

As we were leaving, we passed a booth selling items made of metal and…

20161113_134825…a guy selling little insect-like wire things that you press down on to make them jump.  I smiled, thinking they were clever, and wish I’d bought a couple for my cat!