Capitol Series #4: Oklahoma City

June 13, 2018

The day we arrived in Oklahoma City, we had time to visit the state capitol. As I’ve said before, every capitol building is unique in some way – the Oklahoma state capitol is the only one that is surrounded on all four sides with oil derricks! It is also the only one we’ve seen so far that has a monument to the native tribes of the state displaying the flags of each tribal nation.

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In this view facing the front of the capitol, there is an oil derrick right in front, very close by!
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There was a lot of construction going on.

On the approach to the entrance, there are large square bricks each denoting an important date in Oklahoma history.

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Official state seal

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In the rotunda – we found someone to take a photo of us standing on the Seal of the state of Oklahoma.
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Looking up at the dome

Unlike the capitol in Santa Fe, where there were works of art on all the walls, in Oklahoma, the artwork is on display on the main floor through glass doors where there is a sign “Oklahoma State Art Collection.” Here are some of those works of art.

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Alexandre Hogue (1898-1994), Red Earth Canyon, 1932, egg tempera

 

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Richard Bivens (b. 1939), Painted Seed Jar, ca. 1983

 

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Robert Terrence “Skip” Hill (b. 1961), The Dream Sower Papillon (2005), acrylic collage on canvas

 

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Rick Sinnett (b. 1972), Guardian of the Mother Road (2011), serigraph 49/200

 

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Katherine Gordon Rice (b. 1962), Tatiana, 1995, oil on acrylic on canvas

 

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Brent Learned (b. 1969), Old Man (Arapaho), 2010, acrylic on canvas

 

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Top: Stephen Mopope (1898-1974), Buffalo Hunter, no date, tempera on paper; Bottom: Woody Crumbo (1912-1989), Starlight, ca. 1940s, serigraph

 

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Augusta I. Metcalfe (1881-1971), The Shaw Round Up  (1950), oil on wood panel

 

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Laurie Spencer (b. 1958), Desert Dancer, 1988, ceramic with Terra sigillata slip
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Dolly & Cecil Lee, Dead Forest at Los Alamos, ca. 1995

 

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Martha Wagner (1921-2006), I’m On to Oklahoma, no date, rug hooking, fiber, hand-dyed wool on a linen backing
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O. Gail Poole (1935-2013), The First immigrants (Mind of Man), 1993, oil on paper

 

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Glenda Green (b. 1945), Parasols, 1976, oil on linen

There was a hall of busts, but we did not go look at each of them.SONY DSC
On the third floor was a replica of the figure on top of the dome, of a Native American warrior to celebrate Oklahoma’s native heritage.

Dale took a photo of the actual statue when we went back  outside.
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Below the dome, a few floors up, were semi-circular and trapezoidal murals depicting events in Oklahoma history.DSC_0795
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We saw the door of the Senate chamber, but we could not enter because of construction.
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We did, however, enter the reception area of the governor’s office and talked to the secretary. There was a display case of items the governor has received as gifts as well as a portrait of the governor herself.

We also were able to enter the chamber of the House of Representatives.
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The ceiling was beautiful.
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Some of the moldings in the hallways were quite ornamental and painted in pale green., salmon and gold.

On the main floor, where we were to exit the building, there was a mural that looked very real.
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Outside, we visited the Tribal Flag Plaza with its circle of flags of each tribe including one that was blank, because the people of that tribe do not believe in symbolic representation.
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Another of the four oil derricks is framed behind the circle of flags.

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Near the plaza was a statue of a man on a horse, sculpted by Constance Whitney Warren of Paris, France and New York. It is a bronze tribute to the romantic riders of the range, according to a plaque on the front of the base, and was unveiled in 1930.

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The most distant of the derricks, from our viewpoint, rose above a construction site and an adjacent building.

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